Karol
by Daniel Sabino
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Nice effect
18
font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
18
Nice effect
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Jules & Jim
18
font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
18
Jules & Jim
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Questo Pizzaiolo
18
font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
18
Questo Pizzaiolo
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Karolus Script
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font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
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Karolus Script
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Johannes Itten
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font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
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Johannes Itten
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Doutrina Cristã
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font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
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Doutrina Cristã
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Edmund Fry
18
font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
18
Edmund Fry
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Kerala North
18
font-size: 90px; color: #2b2b2b; line-height: 110%; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: -40px;
The similarity and confusion between Tamil script and Malayalam is widespread. One reason for this is that Tamil is a direct descendant of the script Vattezhutu, which for centuries was used in Malayalam. Their careers in print stumped too, but it is interesting to note that of all the Indian scripts, the first to be printed was Tamil in 1578 in the region of Kerala, a Portuguese colony at that time. The book in question is Doutrina Cristiã, printed with types cast by John Gonsalves a year earlier. Malayalam, as we know it, was only printed about 250 years later by the efforts of Rev. Benjamin Bailey sent by the Church Mission- ary Society to Kottayan. At the time of Doutrina Cristiã, it was said that the types cast by Gonsalves were in Malabar language, which led to confusion regard- ing the language in question. After all Malabar is also the name of the north region of Kerala. Today it is known that it was Tamil, but the confusion around the term malabar persisted for several centuries.
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Kerala North

Karol: Special Buying options

  • Karol Text Pack
  • 4 Fonts
  • 220 €   187 €
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Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic

  • Karol Mix Pack #1
  • 6 Fonts
  • 330 €   280.50 €
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Regular, Italic, SemiBold, SemiBold Italic, Black, Black Italic

  • Karol Family Pack
  • 8 Fonts
  • 440 €   352 €
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Regular, Italic, SemiBold, SemiBold Italic, Bold, Bold Italic, Black, Black Italic

  • Karol Sans Family Pack
  • 12 Fonts
  • 660 €   528 €
  • Add to cart
Light, Light Italic, Regular, Italic, Book, Book Italic, SemiBold, SemiBold Italic, Bold, Bold Italic, Black, Black Italic
Karol

Author
Daniel Sabino

Creation
2013

Actual version
1

Styles
8

Character sets
Basic Latin
Latin-1 Supplement
Latin-2 Central European

License Types
Desktop, Webfont, ePub, App, Server

Description

Karol was designed by Daniel Sabino in 2011 as a project in the MA in Advanced Typography from EINA/UAB, in Barcelona, Spain. 
It was born as a text typeface inspired by the work of East European type designers. Two years later, Karol was ready for public release, in a collection of eight styles (four weights and matching italics) with high readability, strength and character. A few days before its publication, Karol was awarded with the Certificate of Typographic Excellence (Judges’ Choice) of the Type Directors Club in 2013. Karol Sans is its natural companion.

Tags
Display, Display & Text, Editorial Design, On Screen, Serif, Text